Solidarity_faith
Solidarity helps us transcend cultural, political, social and geographic boundaries to embrace the other as thyself. Indeed, Solidarity is Radical (But not in a Political or Ideological Sense). The principle of solidarity is truly radical.

Where does Solidarity Come From?

As with all CST, the principle of Solidarity has its roots in scripture. For at the Last Supper Jesus said:

“I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another.” (John, 13:34)

Solidarity Flows From Faith!

We should remember that Solidarity flows from faith:

"Love of neighbour... consists in the very fact that, in God and with God, I love even the person whom I do not like or even know." (DCE, 18)

How is this possible?

"This can only take place on the basis of an intimate encounter with God, an encounter which has become a communion of will, even affecting my feelings." (DCE, 18)

How Does Solidarity ‘Play Out’ in a Practical Sense?

Benedict XVI reminds us that, as Pope Paul VI indicated we should search for the causes of underdevelopment

"...first of all, in the will, which often neglects the duties of solidarity..." (CIV, 19)

Our Church holds that “the causes of underdevelopment are not primarily of the material order.” (CIV, 19)  So, while it is true that

"Human society is sorely ill. The cause is not so much the depletion of natural resources, nor their monopolistic control by a privileged few; it is rather the weakening of brotherly ties between individuals and nations." (PP, 66)
“In the last analysis, they are to be found in a current self-centeredness and materialistic way of thinking that fails to acknowledge the limitations inherent in every creature.” (Pope Benedict XVI, Address to Vatican Diplomatic Corps, 11 January 2010)

Solidarity transcends cultural, political, social and geographic boundaries - to embrace the other as thyself. Indeed, 

Solidarity is Radical (But not in a Political or Ideological Sense)

The principle of solidarity is truly radical. At the Last Supper Jesus said,

“I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another.” (John, 13:34)

This is a radical charge because how does God love us? – Unremittingly. It is no longer "love our neighbor as ourself" but rather, "love our neighbor as God loves us."

We must internalize just how radical the principle of Solidarity really is. In his second encyclical, Spe Salvi, Pope Benedict XVI wrote,

"Truth and justice must stand above my comfort and physical well-being, or else my life itself becomes a lie." (SS, 38)

Think about that for a moment. If the principles we are describing do not stand above our own comfort – let alone our physical wellbeing – we are told that our life becomes a “lie”!

And a bit later Pope Benedict writes,

"Let us say it once again: the capacity to suffer for the sake of the truth is the measure of humanity." (SS, 39)

This also makes it clear that Solidarity is not an ideological or political principle. It is a Catholic principle based on and emanating from faith. Absent that, it is not the Solidarity of CST. (See also, The Catechism of the Catholic Church, #1948)

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Just a Thought
Yearfaith
The Catholic Social Doctrine has its place where faith and politics meet. The Church’s aim is to not replace the State, but to simply help purify reason and to contribute, here and now, to the acknowledgment and attainment of what is just. Read more